Business Letter

Posted: 11 October 2012 in Tugas
  • Definition Business Letter

    Business letters are formal letters used for business-to-business, business-to-client, or client-to-business correspondence. There are a number of elements to a business letter :

Date & Sender’s Address

  • The first line of a business letter should be the date the letter was written or completed. Directly underneath the date is the sender’s address. Do not include the sender’s name here. Sometimes the sender’s address is listed on a letterhead, in which case the address should not be repeated under the date.

Recipient’s Address

  • If known, the recipient’s address should include the name of the person to whom the letter is directed. You should also include a title (Mr., Mrs., Ms., or Dr.) in front of the name. If you are including the country with the address, capitalize the country name.

Salutation

  • The salutation should be the same as the name written with the recipient’s address, followed by a colon. It is fine to only use the first name if you personally know the person and you typically refer to her by her first name. If you do not know the recipient’s name, it is fine to use the salutation, “To Whom it May Concern.”

Body

  • The body of the letter should be formally written. Use single-spaced lines, except between paragraphs, where a double-spaced line should be inserted. The closing paragraph should summarize what was previously stated throughout the letter.

Closing

  • To close the letter, insert a phrase such as “Thank you” or “Best regards,” followed by a comma. Insert four lines between the closing and sender’s name. This space will be used for your signature once the letter is printed.
  • Types of Business Letters

    There are a number of types of business letters in English., which are :

Making An Inquiry

  • Make an inquiry when you are requesting more information about a product or service. This type of business letter tends to include specific information such as product type, as well as asking for further details in the form of brochures, catalogs, telephone contact, etc. Making inquiries can also help you keep up on your competition!

Sales Letters

  • Sales Letters are used to introduce new products to new customers and past clients. It’s important to outline an important problem that needs to be solved and provide the solution in sales letters. This example letter provides an outline, as well as important phrases to use when sending out a wide variety of sales letters.

Replying to an Inquiry

  • Replying to inquiries are one of the most important business letters that you write. Customers who make inquiries are interested in specific information, and are excellent business prospects. Learn how to thank the customers, provide as much information as possible, as well as make a call to action for a positive outcome.

Account Terms and Conditions

  • When a new customer opens an account it is essential to inform them of account terms and conditions. If you run a small business, it is common to provide these terms and conditions in the form of a letter. This guide provides a clear example on which you can base your own business letters providing account terms and conditions.

Letters of Acknowledgment

  • For legal purposes letters of acknowledgment are often requested. These letters are also referred to as letters of receipt and tend to be rather formal and short. These two examples letters will provide you with a template to use in your own work and can be easily adapted for a number of purposes.

Placing an Order

  • As a business person, you will often place an order – especially if you have a large supply chain for your product. This example business letter provides an outline to make sure your order placement is clear so that you receive exactly what you order.

Making a Claim

  • Unfortunately, from time to time it is necessary to make a claim against unsatisfactory work. This example business letter provides a strong example of a claim letter and includes important phrases to express your dissatisfaction and future expectations when making a claim.

Adjusting a Claim

  • Even the best business may make a mistake from time to time. In this case, you may be called upon to adjust a claim. This type of business letter provides an example to send to unsatisfied customers making sure that you address their specific concerns, as well as retain them as future customers.

Cover Letters

  • Cover letters are extremely important when applying for a new position. Cover letters should include a short introduction, highlight the most important information in your resume and elicit a positive response from your prospective employer. These two examples of cover letters are part of a larger section on the site providing all the information you will need on taking an interview in English during your job search.
  • Parts of a Business Letter

The Heading (The Retern Address) or Letterhead

  • Companies usually use printed paper where heading or letterhead is specially designed at the top of the sheet. It bears all the necessary information about the organisation’s identity.

Date

  • Date of writing. The month should be fully spelled out and the year written with all four digits October 12, 2005 (12 October 2005 – UK style). The date is aligned with the return address. The number of the date is pronounced as an ordinal figure, though the endings stndrdth, are often omitted in writing. The article before the number of the day is pronounced but not written. In the body of the letter, however, the article is written when the name of the month is not mentioned with the day.

The Inside Address

  • In a business or formal letter you should give the address of the recipient after your own address. Include the recipient’s name, company, address and postal code. Add job title if appropriate. Separate the recipient’s name and title with a comma. Double check that you have the correct spelling of the recipient ‘s name.
    The Inside Address is always on the left margin. If an 8 1/2″ x 11″ paper is folded in thirds to fit in a standard 9″ business envelope, the inside address can appear through the window in the envelope.

The Greeting

  • Also called the salutation. The type of salutation depends on your relationship with the recipient. It normally begins with the word “Dear” and always includes the person’s last name. Use every resource possible to address your letter to an actual person. If you do not know the name or the sex of of your reciever address it to Dear Madam/Sir (or Dear Sales Manager or Dear Human Resources Director). As a general rule the greeting in a business letter ends in a colon (US style). It is also acceptable to use a comma (UK style).

The Subject Line (optional)

  • Its inclusion can help the recipient in dealing successfully with the aims of your letter. Normally the subject sentence is preceded with the word Subject: orRe: Subject line may be emphasized by underlining, using bold font, or all captial letters. It is usually placed one line below the greeting but alternatively can be located directly after the “inside address,” before the “greeting.”

The Body Paragraphs

  • The body is where you explain why you’re writing. It’s the main part of the business letter. Make sure the receiver knows who you are and why you are writing but try to avoid starting with “I”. Use a new paragraph when you wish to introduce a new idea or element into your letter. Depending on the letter style you choose, paragraphs may be indented. Regardless of format, skip a line between paragraphs.

The Complimentary Close

  • This short, polite closing ends always with a comma. It is either at the left margin or its left edge is in the center, depending on the Business Letter Style that you use. It begins at the same column the heading does. The traditional rule of etiquette in Britain is that a formal letter starting “Dear Sir or Madam” must end “Yours faithfully”, while a letter starting “Dear ” must end “Yours sincerely”. (Note: the second word of the closing is NOT capitalized)

Signature and Writer’s identification

  • The signature is the last part of the letter. You should sign your first and last names. The signature line may include a second line for a title, if appropriate. The signature should start directly above the first letter of the signature line in the space between the close and the signature line. Use blue or black ink.

Initials, Enclosures, Copies

  • Initials are to be included if someone other than the writer types the letter. If you include other material in the letter, put ‘Enclosure’, ‘Enc.’, or ‘ Encs. ‘, as appropriate, two lines below the last entry. cc means a copy or copies are sent to someone else.
  • Style Letters Of Business

               1. Profesional Style Letter Business

Description
1.the heading (the retern address) or letterhead – companies usually use printed paper where heading or letterhead is specially designed at the top of the sheet. it bears all the necessary information about the organisation’s identity..
2. Date: Type the date of your letter two to six lines below the letterhead. Three are standard. If there is no letterhead, type it where shown
3. inside Address: If your stationery has a letterhead, skip this. Otherwise, type your name, address and optionally, phone number. These days, it’s common to also include an email address.
4. . Salutation: Type the recipient’s name here. Type Mr. or Ms. [Last Name] to show respect, but don’t guess spelling or gender. Some common salutations are
* Ladies:
* Gentlemen:
* Dear Sir:
* Dear Sir or Madam:
* Dear [Full Name]:
* To Whom it May Concern:
5. Body: Type two spaces between sentences. Keep it brief and to the point.
6. Complimentary Close: What you type here depends on the tone and degree of formality. For example,
* Respectfully yours (very formal)
* Sincerely (typical, less formal)
* Very truly yours (polite, neutral)
* Cordially yours (friendly, informal)
7. Signature Block: Leave four blank lines after the Complimentary Close (11) to sign your name. Sign your name exactly as you type it below your signature. Title is optional depending on relevancy and degree of formality. Examples are
* John Doe, Manager
* P. Smith
Director, Technical Support
* R. T. Jones – Sr. Field Engineer
8. Identification Initials: If someone typed the letter for you, he or she would typically include three of your initials in all uppercase characters, then two of his or hers in all lowercase characters. If you typed your own letter, just skip it since your name is already in the Signature Block (12). Common styles are below.
• JAD/cm
• JAD:cm
• clm

               2. Standart Letter Business

Description

1. Address: if your stationery has a letterhead, skip this. Otherwise, type your name, address and optionally, phone number. These days, it’s common to also include an email address
.
2. Title – companies usually use printed paper where heading or letterhead is specially designed at the top of the sheet. it bears all the necessary information about the organisation’s identity

3. Attention Type the recipient’s name here. Type Mr. or Ms. [Last Name] to show respect, but don’t guess spelling or gender. Some common salutations are
* Ladies:
* Gentlemen:
* Dear Sir:
* Dear Sir or Madam:
* Dear [Full Name]:
* To Whom it May Concern:

4. Initials : If someone typed the letter for you, he or she would typically include three of your initials in all uppercase characters, then two of his or hers in all lowercase characters. If you typed your own letter, just skip it since your name is already in the Signature Block (12). Common styles are below.
• JAD/cm
• JAD:cm
• clm

               3. Semi Block Letters Of Business

Description

SEMI BLOCK STYLE
[YOUR NAME]
[STREET • CITY • STATE • ZIP CODE] (1)
[PHONE # • FAX PHONE # • MESSAGES PHONE # • EMAIL]

&NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; [DATE TODAY] (2)

RE: [TO WHAT THIS LETTER REFERS] (3)
[CERTIFIED MAIL] (4)
[PERSONAL] (5)
[RECIPIENT’S NAME] &NB SP; (6)
[COMPANY NAME]
[ADDRESS]
[ADDRESS]
ATTENTION [RECIPIENT’S NAME] (7)
DEAR [RECIPIENT’S NAME] (8)
[SUBJECT] (9)
THE MAIN CHARACTERISTIC OF MODIFIED BLOCK BUSINESS LETTERS IS THAT EVERYTHING IS FLUSH WITH THE LEFT MARGIN, EXCEPT AS SHOWN. MODIFIED BLOCK LETTERS ARE A LITTLE LESS FORMAL THAN FULL BLOCK LETTERS. (10)
IF YOUR LETTER IS ONLY ONE PAGE, TYPE THE COMPLIMENTARY CLOSE AND OPTIONAL COMPONENTS AS SHOWN BELOW. OTHERWISE, TYPE THEM ON THE LAST PAGE OF YOUR LETTER.
&NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; SINCERELY, (11)

&NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; [SIGNATURE] (12)
&NB SP; &NB SP; &NB SP; [YOUR NAME, TITLE]
[IDENTIFICATION INITIALS] (13)
ENCLOSURES: [NUMBER] (14)

CC: [NAME FOR COPY] &NB SP; (15)
[NAME FOR COPY]

               4. Full Block Letter Of Business

Description

1. Return Address: If your stationery has a letterhead, skip this. Otherwise, type your name, address and optionally, phone number. These days, it’s common to also include an email address.
2. Date: Type the date of your letter two to six lines below the letterhead. Three are standard. If there is no letterhead, type it where shown.
3. Reference Line: If the recipient specifically requests information, such as a job reference or invoice number, type it on one or two lines, immediately below the Date (2). If you’re replying to a letter, refer to it here. For example,
• Re: Job # 625-01
• Re: Your letter dated 1/1/200x.
4. Special Mailing Notations: Type in all uppercase characters, if appropriate. Examples include
• SPECIAL DELIVERY
• CERTIFIED MAIL
• AIRMAIL
5. On-Arrival Notations: Type in all uppercase characters, if appropriate. You might want to include a notation on private correspondence, such as a resignation letter. Include the same on the envelope. Examples are
• PERSONAL
• CONFIDENTIAL
6. Inside Address: Type the name and address of the person and/or company to whom you’re sending the letter, three to eight lines below the last component you typed. Four lines are standard. If you type an Attention Line (7), skip the person’s name here. Do the same on the envelope.
7. Attention Line: Type the name of the person to whom you’re sending the letter. If you type the person’s name in the Inside Address (6), skip this. Do the same on the envelope.
8. Salutation: Type the recipient’s name here. Type Mr. or Ms. [Last Name] to show respect, but don’t guess spelling or gender. Some common salutations are
• Ladies:
• Gentlemen:
• Dear Sir:
• Dear Sir or Madam:
• Dear [Full Name]:
• To Whom it May Concern:
9. Subject Line: Type the gist of your letter in all uppercase characters, either flush left or centered. Be concise on one line. If you type a Reference Line (3), consider if you really need this line. While it’s not really necessary for most employment-related letters, examples are below.
• SUBJECT: RESIGNATION
• LETTER OF REFERENCE
• JOB INQUIRY
10. Body: Type two spaces between sentences. Keep it brief and to the point.
11. Complimentary Close: What you type here depends on the tone and degree of formality. For example,
• Respectfully yours (very formal)
• Sincerely (typical, less formal)
• Very truly yours (polite, neutral)
• Cordially yours (friendly, informal)
12. Signature Block: Leave four blank lines after the Complimentary Close (11) to sign your name. Sign your name exactly as you type it below your signature. Title is optional depending on relevancy and degree of formality. Examples are
• John Doe, Manager
• P. Smith
Director, Technical Support
• R. T. Jones – Sr. Field Engineer
13. Identification Initials: If someone typed the letter for you, he or she would typically include three of your initials in all uppercase characters, then two of his or hers in all lowercase characters. If you typed your own letter, just skip it since your name is already in the Signature Block (12). Common styles are below.
• JAD/cm
• JAD:cm
• clm
14. Enclosure Notation: This line tells the reader to look in the envelope for more. Type the singular for only one enclosure, plural for more. If you don’t enclose anything, skip it. Common styles are below.
• Enclosure
• Enclosures: 3
• Enclosures (3)
15. cc: Stands for courtesy copies (formerly carbon copies). List the names of people to whom you distribute copies, in alphabetical order. If addresses would be useful to the recipient of the letter, include them. If you don’t copy your letter to anyone, skip it.

               5. Block Style Letters Of Business

Description

1. Heading: Type the recipient’s name, page number, and Date and Reference Line from page 1. Type the heading across the page as shown, or type it flush with the left margin as in a full block letter. If you don’t know the recipient’s name, type the same thing as you did in the Inside Address on page 1; e.g., the company name.
2. Body: Indent the first sentence in paragraphs five spaces. Type two spaces between sentences. Keep it brief and to the point.
3. Complimentary Close: Type this five spaces to the right of center as shown on page 1, or right justify it with the date if you typed the Heading (1) across the page, as shown above. What you type here depends on the tone and degree of formality. For example,

* Respectfully yours (very formal)
* Sincerely (typical, less formal)
* Very truly yours (polite, neutral)
* Cordially yours (friendly, informal)

4. Signature Block: Leave four blank lines after the Complimentary Close (3) to sign your name. Sign your name exactly as you type it below your signature. Title is optional depending on relevancy and degree of formality. Examples are

* John Doe, Manager
* P. Smith
Director, Technical Support
* R. T. Jones – Sr. Field Engineer

5. Identification Initials: If someone typed the letter for you, he or she would typically include three of your initials in all uppercase characters, then two of his or hers in all lowercase characters. If you typed it, just skip it since your name is already in the Signature Block (4). Common styles are below.

* JAD/cm
* JAD:cm
* clm

6. Enclosure Notation: This line tells the reader to look in the envelope for more documents. Type the singular for only one enclosure, plural for more. If you don’t enclose anything, skip it. Common styles are below.

* Enclosure
* Enclosures: 3
* Enclosures (3)

7. cc: Stands for courtesy copies (formerly carbon copies). List the names of people to whom you distribute copies, in alphabetical order. If addresses would be useful to the recipient of the letter, include them. If you don’t copy your letter to anyone, skip it.

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